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Raising Strong, Resilient Children
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Welcome to Our New Website!

 

Welcome to The Successful Parent! If you've never been here before, we have just launched our newly redesigned site, which is now mobile friendly and allows everyone to join in the conversation. For our regular followers, welcome back! We hope you will like the new design. You will find the same categories on the top menu, and again on each page you visit on the site. To see a list of all of the articles on the site, just click the "Archives" button below. We've added the "comments" capacity at the end of each blog and look forward to hearing what you have to say. We also encourage you to add your email address to our list so that we can notify you of new blogs, parenting tips, and new features. Don't forget to visit our sister website, The Successful Grownup. Happy Reading!

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Early Adolescence: The Point of No Return - Part II

In the last article (Early Adolescence: Part I), I described the major changes in development that take place among young adolescents during the years between twelve and fourteen. Included was a discussion of the onset of puberty with its accompanying changes in sexuality, physical development, and new focus on appearance. Along with puberty, changes in cognitive development revealed a new capacity for thinking about problems hypothetically, allowing young teens to begin to evaluate not only their own values and behavior, but also those of authority figures and peers alike.

Fathers and Daughters

Fathers and Daughters

Most everyone is familiar with the phrase "Daddy's little girl." It connotes the special relationship that begins to appear between fathers and daughters somewhere around six to seven years of age. Up until that time, mom has been the primary person in the young girl's life, but as the child moves into the early middle childhood years (six through eleven), a growing need for the father's influence and affections begin to surface.

Stressbusters for Children

Stressbusters for Children

Here's our checklist for minimizing your child's stress load. This list will work for both young children and adolescents, and should assist you in taking some concrete steps toward enhancing your child's overall quality of life. For a full discussion of the sources of childhood stress, read the article posted on our website entitled "Assessing Childhood Stress".

Assessing Childhood Stress

Assessing Childhood Stress

Stress has become a prominent factor in all of our lives due to the complications of living in a fast-paced society in which we are faced with a multitude of daily intrusions on our inner peace. "Inner peace?" you ask. "What's that?" Precisely. For parents, the stress is played out day after day as we struggle to meet economic demands (which often means that both parents work), find affordable day-care, deal with schools, teachers, our kids' homework and academic struggles, etc.

Getting Through the Terrible Twos

Getting Through the Terrible Twos

The "terrible twos" conjures up a picture of a raging toddler pitching a very loud tantrum in the seat of a shopping cart in the grocery store while her very distraught mother (or father) frantically tries to soothe or distract him (maybe shoving cookies in his mouth) as others look on disapprovingly with looks that say "Can't you control your child?" If you've been a parent of a young child, you have probably experienced something along these lines at some time or another when your child was in her second or third year.

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